HISTORY

VeloX (1)

In 2009, a new world record was broken by the Canadian Sam Wittingham at Battle Mountain: 133 km/h in a human powered vehicle. This record was achieved by riding an aerodynamic recumbent bicycle. It gathered attention from people all around the world. When some students from Delft heard about this, they were impressed and intrigued, but also inspired. They thought about how much faster they could go if they were to build an even more technically advanced bike. The students came to a decision: to break the world record with their own bike within 3 years. Thus the Human Power Team was born. Made out of a carbon-fibre frame and a precisely engineered aerodynamic shell, the very first VeloX was born.

The goal for the first year was to design and produce a bike to participate in the yearly race for the fastest bikes in the world, the World Human Powered Speed Challenge (WHPSC). Not only did Sebastiaan Bowier win the WHPSC 2011, he also broke the European speed record with 130 km/h. A fantastic result for our first year!

VeloX (1)
130

km/h

VeloX 2

The road to the world record was continued by the VeloX 2. The second team designed and built a completely new VeloX with lots of innovations.

This is the first VeloX with a StuD-drive, which means that the cycling motion is elliptical instead of the usual circular shape. This made room for a sharper nose of the VeloX, which improved the aerodynamics. The window was also completely removed. The VeloX 1 showed that the connection between the shell and the window increased the turbulent airflow around the VeloX. Additionally, the vision through the often foggy window was poor. Instead, the cyclist solely depends on a camera-monitor system with live stream to gain vision. Finally, this is the first VeloX with a monocoque structure. This means it consists of one continuous shell. The only holes in the structure are for air-intake, the wheels and a hole at the top for the cyclist to get in and out. With this design, the Human Power Team won the WHPSC for the second time!

VeloX 2
129

km/h

VeloX 3

After the first prototype made in year 1 and the many innovations made in year 2, team 3 faced the daunting task to finally build a record-breaking bicycle. The plan of this team was to take the best aspects of the VeloX 1 & 2, and fuse them into a new VeloX.

A lot of design choices made in the VeloX 2 were also implemented in the VeloX 3. The monocoque construction, which ensures an almost seamless shell, and the camera/monitor system instead of a window, can also be found in the VeloX 3. However, there were also some changes. The StuD-drive, the drive mechanism with an elliptical driving motion, was replaced with a drive mechanism with a circular driving motion. Tests showed that the improvement in aerodynamic drag, was less than the increase in friction resulting from the StuD-drive. Finally, some new improvements were made. For example, the VeloX 3 uses a planetary gear in the hub of the wheel. This is a more efficient solution, in terms of space, than the one used in the VeloX 1 & 2. Additionally, this is the first and only VeloX with rear wheel drive.

In September 2013 the Human Power Team departed for America for the third time with one goal: to break the world record. The entire week, the team was struck by problems. Technical issues, bad weather, it just didn't work out the way they wanted to. Until the last day. On the 14th of September conditions were just right. Sebastiaan Bowier raced through the Nevada desert at 134 km/h, and the world record was broken!

VeloX 3
134

km/h

VeloX IV

Despite the fact that the team already held the world record, the developments did not come to an end. The team was (and still is) convinced that the limits of human capability have not been reached. In an attempt to go even faster, the VeloX IV was developed. The design was characterized by a promising but risky new aerodynamic shape: a 'supercritical' design, with mixed results. Still, Rik Houwers reached a speed of 132 km/h in the VeloX IV, securing the 4th win of the World Human Powered Speed Challenge in a row (and only 1.5 km h under the WR)! Additionaly, Christien Veelenturf achieved 111 km/h and ranked third in the women's competition. It's our challenge to top top that this year!

VeloX IV
132

km/h

VeloX V

The aerodynamics are improved.

VeloX V
98

km/h

VeloX 6

The aerodynamic shell is also designed on crosswinds.

VeloX 6
125

km/h